Legal Marriage Requirements for

JAMAICA

Jamaica allows both civil and religious ceremonies.

Residency: Visitors may get married 24 hours after arriving in Jamaica, if they’ve applied

ahead of time for the marriage license.

License: To apply for a Jamaica marriage license, contact the Ministry of Justice in Jamaica

(2 Oxford Road, NCB Towers, 10th Floor/South Tower, Kingston 5, JAMAICA; phone 1

876 906 4923 -31; fax 1 876 906 1712 -3; office hours MON-THU 9 am-5 pm or FRI 9 am-

4 pm; customerservice@moj.gov.jm). The license fee is 4,000 Jamaican dollars (approx.

US$43 or CAN$43).

Required documents: Notarized copies of the following:

• Proof of citizenship (certified copy of birth certificate showing the father’s name)

• Parents’ written consent (if under 18 years of age)

• Proof of divorce (if applicable) – the original divorce certificate if possible, or a

certified copy in other cases

• Spouse’s death certificate (for widow or widower, if applicable)

French Canadians must supply notarized translated copies of all documents (into English)

and a photocopy of the original French documents.

Required blood texts or physical exams: None

Officiant: Only a marriage officer licensed in Jamaica may legally marry a couple. Another

officiant chosen by the couple may conduct the ceremony, but a locally licensed marriage

officer must be present to sign the marriage form and make the official marriage

pronouncement. Local marriage officers may also provide witnesses for the ceremony

(usually for an additional fee).

Other requirements: The marriage must be performed by 8 pm, with two witnesses

present to view the ceremony and sign the marriage forms. After your marriage in Jamaica,

you will receive a signed “marriage register” to keep while officials prepare a certified copy

of your marriage certificate (which your destination wedding agent or resort/ship wedding

coordinator will obtain for you – a process that could take several months). Same-sex

ceremonies may be conducted in a non-binding fashion but are not legally recognized in

Jamaica.

(Source: Jamaica Tourist Board)